ABOUT US

86AboutUsFounded in 2008 as a 501c3 in Chicago, the Latino Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders Alliance (LAMDA) is a nonprofit organization with the mission to educate and engage Latino caregivers of Alzheimer’s and Memory disorders family members by providing skill building training, and compassionate support programs.

In 8 years, LAMDA has grown from being a grass-roots organization in Chicago metropolitan area to an organization that provides workshops and training services in five different cities (San Francisco, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Tampa, New York, and Chicago). LAMDA created a curriculum for healthcare providers that is being implemented nationwide. Also, LAMDA created an evidenced-based practice program for caregivers that is sensitive to the Latino community.

LAMDA’s mission has earned recognition, including the Illinois Office of Governor, and Illinois Department on Aging. Chicago Tribune, LA Times, Univision, NBC, La Opinion, and Seattle Times.

Mission Statement:

To educate, empower, and engage the Latino caregiver of Alzheimer’s and memory disorders family members by providing skill building training, and compassionate support programs.
Empowering La Familia, empowers La Comunidad.

Core Values:

Compassion: We will continue to treat our staff, volunteers, and serve the Latino Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers with utmost compassion via our programs, services, and teamwork. Compassion means we care.

Collaboration: We will continue to further and encourage teamwork within our workplace, our partners and affiliates, and the Latino community.

Quality treatment: We will continue to provide the Latino community of families and caregivers with top treatment and care, as well as treat our workplace and affiliates with quality.

Board Members:

Constantina Mizis
President and CEO, The Latino Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders Alliance

Debra Wesley
President of Sinai Community Institute and Executive Vice President of Community Outreach at Sinai Health System

Susan Vega
Senior Programs Manager at Alivio Medical Center & ACA Outreach Director

Gustavo Saberbain
State Director at Addus Healthcare Inc.

Raul Garcia
Multicultural Outreach Manager, Sinai Community Institute

Meet our CEO:

Founder, President and CEO, The Latino Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders Alliance

Mrs. Mizis is the founding executive director of The Latino Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders Alliance (LAMDA) headquartered in Chicago, IL. LAMDA is on the frontline of addressing Alzheimer's growing impact on the Latino community and provides direct services to thousands of Latinos struggling with Alzheimer's annually. Constantina Mizis has dedicated over 20 years of service to older Latino adults and their family caregivers, has consulted and trained extensively throughout the United States, and has affiliated with national organizations on the development of programs for the Latino elderly. Mrs. Mizis’ work and commitment to excellence have earned recognition, including the Illinois Office of Governor, and Illinois Department on Aging. NPR, Chicago Tribune, LA Times, Univision, NBC, La Opinion, The Washington Post, and Seattle Times, are some of the Media that highlight the efforts of Constantina Mizis on the Latino community who are suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Prior to founding LAMDA, Mizis served as a multicultural outreach manager for the Alzheimer's Association Illinois Chapter and as a multicultural outreach and community affairs manager at the Sinai Community Institute (SCI).

Constantina Mizis is an active board member and consultant of Nation’s top health committees, such as Mayo Clinic’s National Alzheimer’s & Dementia Patient & Caregiver-Powered Research Network (AD-PCPRN) Governance Board. Constantina currently resides in the Chicagoland area with her husband and mini-schnauzer. Constantina studied Philosophy and Arts and Letters at Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, in Mexico. She speaks fluent Spanish, Greek, and English.


Action Plan:

LAMDA’s commitment is to work with our Latino community, to teach our community how to best care for our relatives; conduct cultural sensitivity seminars for health providers; educate family members about their care options, and increase home and community-based care services by Latino caregivers.
  1. Implement educational and support programs to increase the skills, knowledge, and confidence of caregivers of Latinos living with dementia.
  2. Conduct trainings in quality dementia care and cultural competency for community-based health and social service providers.
  3. Provide information and referrals to help Latino families make informed decisions about their services and long-term care options, while facilitating access to services.
  4. Increase access to home and community-based care services by training “care Advocates,” Latino paraprofessionals who conduct outreach, arrange respite care, facilitate support groups, and assist families to better understand available service options. Care Advocates will also help families apply for these services, conduct family education programs, and serve as a recognized community dementia resource.
  5. Provide memory screenings to the Latino community nationwide.
  6. Provide a Research Center dedicated to leading advancements in find the cure to Alzheimer’s with a focus on the correlation between Latino mental health and memory disorders via clinical trials.

Vision

“Supporting caregivers, protecting our loved ones, diminishing Alzheimer’s in its tracks.”